Hematology & Oncology
Researchers examine a specimen in the Merajver Lab

Division of Hematology & Oncology

Highly committed to excellence in patient care, teaching and research for cancer and hematologic disorders.

On the Leading Edge of Excellence

The U-M Medical School Department of Internal Medicine Division of Hematology and Oncology is the largest subspecialty unit within the Department of Internal Medicine. Our faculty, staff, students and laboratory personnel occupy space in seven locations on the medical campus, including the Michigan Medicine Rogel Cancer Center. We are highly committed to excellence in patient care, teaching and research for cancer and hematologic disorders.

About

Learn more about the groundbreaking research, training and patient care in the Division of Hematology and Oncology.

Education

Combining well-rounded clinical training with opportunities to work with world-class investigators in a collegial environment.

Research

Explore exciting opportunities in a wide range of areas, from basic laboratory experiments to conducting experimental clinical treatments.

Faculty

See a list of the faculty who guide our clinical, research and educational programs on the path to excellence.

Patient Care

We provide care for patients at our numerous state-of-the-art specialty clinics and programs at the Rogel Cancer Center.

Giving

Learn how you can support our wide range of clinical, research and educational opportunities that are transforming lives every day.

Join Our Team

The Division of Hematology and Oncology is the largest subspecialty unit in the Department of Internal Medicine, and welcomes eligible applicants to join our fantastic team.

Join Us
Hematology & Oncology Internal Website

Resources and information for current Hematology & Oncology faculty, staff and learners.

Hematology & Oncology Intranet
Empowering Well-Being & DEI

The Department of Internal Medicine Division of Hematology and Oncology is committed to creating and cultivating a diverse and inclusive community that provides our faculty, learners, and staff with the opportunities and support they need to thrive.

Learn more about our DEI efforts
CME Courses

View a list of upcoming Continuing Medical Education (CME) opportunities available through the Department of Internal Medicine.

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