Cardiovascular Medicine
A group of students watching a demonstration in a lab

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine

Advancing the understanding and prevention of cardiovascular disease.

Taking Collaborative Care to Heart

Welcome to the U-M Medical School Department of Internal Medicine Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Led by interim division chief, John Bisognano, MD, PhD, the division is comprised of more than 120 faculty and 34 fellows dedicated to treating, preventing and understanding rare and complex heart conditions.

About

Learn more about the groundbreaking research, training and patient care in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.

Education

Our fellowship programs provide rigorous clinical training and investigative skills necessary to develop successful careers in cardiovascular medicine.

Research

Our research centers and programs make great discoveries in basic, translational and clinical research, improving the lives of those living with heart disease.

Faculty

See a list of the diverse faculty who guide our clinical, research and educational programs on the path to excellence.

Patient Care

We provide care for patients in numerous specialty clinics at the Frankel Cardiovascular Center and clinics located throughout Michigan.

Giving

Learn how you can support our wide range of clinical, research and educational opportunities that are transforming lives every day.

Join Our Team

Our division is comprised of more than 120 faculty and 34 fellows dedicated to treating, preventing, and understanding rare and complex heart conditions.

Join our team
Cardiovascular Medicine Internal Website

Resources and information for current Cardiovascular Medicine faculty, staff and learners.

Cardiovascular Medicine Intranet
Empowering Well-Being & DEI

The Department of Internal Medicine Division of Cardiovascular Medicine is committed to creating and cultivating a diverse and inclusive community that provides our faculty, learners, and staff with the opportunities and support they need to thrive.

Learn more about our DEI efforts
CME Courses

View a list of upcoming Continuing Medical Education (CME) opportunities available through the Department of Internal Medicine.

Stay Connected With Internal Medicine
exterior view of cardiovascular center at dusk with views of spiral garden and interior atrium Each year at the Frankel Cardiovascular Center:
6,000
Hospital inpatients treated
35,000
Outpatients treated
4,800
Electrophysiological studies and procedures performed
800
Open-heart operations on adults
Featured News & Stories See all news surgery gloves passing tool blue and yellow
Health Lab
A universal heparin reversal drug is shown effective in mice
The newest version of the heparin reversal drug, described in a recent issue of Advanced Healthcare Materials, adjusted the number of protons bound to it, making the molecule less positive so it would preferentially bind to the highly negative heparin, resulting in a much safer drug.
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Health Lab Podcast
New research highlights preventable deaths for patients undergoing PCI procedures
Complications during procedures only contributed to death in about 20% of cases.
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Health Lab
Around 10% of deaths from coronary stenting, balloon angioplasty are preventable
Around 10% of all deaths following percutaneous coronary intervention are potentially preventable, a study led by Michigan Medicine finds.
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Positive outlook propels woman through heart failure and on to a new heart
After seven years of waiting, a Michigan woman celebrates a lifesaving heart transplant and recovery close to home
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Health Lab
Novel risk score for cardiovascular complications after bone marrow transplant
More bone marrow transplants, also known as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, are being offered to older patients, a population at greater risk of cardiovascular disease.
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Health Lab
Female genetic markers may have greater effect on hypertension, certain cardiovascular diseases
Female genetic markers may have greater effect on hypertension, certain cardiovascular diseases